Brewing English Beers

10708601_820562431317839_7253150899409655501_oEnglish beer styles are some of favorites.  Malty, easy-drinking, and distinct, English ales are fun to brew and present a unique challenge for experimentation.  The different styles of English beer are not extremely popular in America, where American IPA tends to rule the land.  However, they can be some great beers to brew.  Best enjoyed fresh, a bottle of Fuller’s gathering dust on the store shelf can never compare to a nice English-style pint made nearby.

So, what defines an English beer?  First, it’s the malt.  English barley is more highly kilned, producing a flavor that is toasty, with a touch of honey.  With Maris Otter or other UK barley as the base for the beer, you’re going to get a fuller malt profile even without specialty grains compared to a pilsner malt or American barley based beer.  Graham cracker isn’t too far off.

Second, it’s the yeast.  English beers use English ale yeast, top-fermenting yeasts which tend to be a bit fruitier than American ale strains.  They can also leave more residual sugar, resulting in a fuller malt profile, which compliments the grain bill.

Third, it’s the hops.  In comparison to spicy noble hops or citrusy American hops, English hops tend to taste earthy and sometimes floral.  You might get a bit of fruitiness, but more like orange marmalade rather than grapefruit or mango from Centennial or Citra hops.

Last, English beers tend to be more restrained in general.  You’re not looking for the bold roasty flavor of a robust porter, the in-your-face citrus of American IPA, or the high ABV of an imperial ale.  You don’t want that.  More hops and roasted malts will cover up that great toasty malt flavor.  Furthermore, with English hops, a little goes a long way.

From a brewing perspective, I like designing English-style beers that are a bit outside the box.  It’s a challenge, since the styles are generally fairly restrained and simple.  Here are three recipes I greatly enjoy, named after my setter, Logan.  The first is a pretty standard beer, but the rest are something you don’t see too often.  As you can tell from the recipes, I am a fan of the Fuller’s strain.  Ferment cool and perform a diacetyl rest for optimum flavor.  I also love Target as a dry hop–it has an orange flavor that is a nice compliment to earthy EKG hops.

Logan’s Song: English pale ale

This is a really basic English bitter that is a fantastic everyday beer to have.  A nice showcase for Maris Otter and crystal malt.  Just killer on nitro.

5.5 gallon batch size

1.050 OG

30 IBU

8.5 lbs Maris Otter

0.75 lbs Crystal 60

0.25 lbs Crystal 120

0.5 ounces Warrior (18.9 AA) @ 60 minutes

2 ounces East Kent Goldings @ 2 minutes

WLP 002 or Wyeast 1968 yeast

Bad Boy: Black ESB

This beer is interesting and very tasty.  Think of it as a stout, minus the roastiness.  It’s dark, smooth, and hoppy, with a firm bitterness.

1.060 OG

40 IBU

8 lbs Maris Otter

0.75 lbs Carafa III special (dehusked)

0.5 lbs Crystal 15

0.5 ounces Warrior (18.9 AA) @ 60 minutes

2 ounces East Kent Goldings @ 2 minutes

1 ounce Target dry hop

WLP 002 or Wyeast 1968 yeast

Lord Logan: English IPA

This is a pretty cool beer that is a bit like a hoppy English barleywine.  It tastes similar to Avery Hog Heaven.  Amber malt is a great way to give a quasi-smoked flavor to beers reminiscent of pre-industrial revolution porters that used malt kilned over wood fires.

1.085 OG

75 IBU

14 lbs Maris Otter

1 lb Amber Malt

1 lb Turbinado Sugar

0.5 lbs Caramel 120

1.5 ounces Warrior (18.9 AA) @ 60 minutes

2 ounces East Kent Goldings @ 2 minutes

1 ounce East Kent Goldings dry hop

1 ounce Target dry hop

WLP 002 or Wyeast 1968 yeast

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About crookedrunbrewing

Brewmaster
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